Entries from August 2012 ↓

News Corporation shares sale

Company
Name

Buy/Sell

Date

Trade
Value

Director

Volume
/ Price

News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $4,253,158.56 Rupert
Murdoch
182,539
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $1,800,856.94 Chase
Carey
77,290
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $1,712,340.24 Arthur
Siskind
73,491
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $1,662,641.35 James
Murdoch
71,358
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $1,498,422.95 David
DeVoe
64,310
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $1,283,037.76 Rupert
Murdoch
55,066
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $1,169,263.86 Rupert
Murdoch
50,183
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $1,012,990.77 Chase
Carey
43,476
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $942,205.37 Rupert
Murdoch
40,438
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $858,651.57 Rupert
Murdoch
36,852
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $787,866.17 Chase
Carey
33,814
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $726,610.48 Arthur
Siskind
31,185
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $600,790.48 James
Murdoch
25,785
@ $23.30
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $533,822.30 Arthur
Siskind
22,901
@ $23.31
News
Corp. ‘A’ Shares
Sell 15-Aug-12 $478,046.08 David
DeVoe
20,517
@ $23.30

 

Conservative leader of Corby Borough Council, David Sims – Louise Mensch – C4 News 09/08/2012

Channel 4 News
Thursday 9th August 2012

Speakers: Michael Crick
David Simms

MC: Did you ask her whether she was thinking of quitting?

DS: I think most people asked her

MC: And what did she say?

DS: She wouldn’t respond

MC: And did you ask her?

DS: I’ve mentioned it in the past yes.

MC: and she didn’t respond when you asked her?

DS: Not in a, she answered it in a political way shall we say…

MC: An evasive answer you mean?

DS: I said a political way

-ends-

Conservative leader of Corby Borough Council , David Simms – Louise Mensch

Sky News
Monday 6th August 2012

Speakers: Kay Burley
David Simms

KB: What was your reaction to the news?

DS: Well we weren’t entirely surprised however it is still very disappointing.

KB: That is a very short comment about the fact that she has been your MP for quite a while, I mean what sort of impact has she had in the area and what difference do you think it will make with a by-election coming up. Labour very much focusing on that constituency of course.

DS: Well she has worked very hard in Corby, sometimes the public perception hasn’t because she has got very good media attention nationally but sometimes locally she wasn’t given the same sort of attention and given the credit for some of the work that she did in the town. It is disappointing that she has had to resign but quite understandably when you think of the fact that being a parliamentarian is a very difficult job, a very difficult job indeed, you have to be very, very dedicated, I’m not saying she wasn’t dedicated but she had a family life, a very young family and splitting her life between New York and the constituency and also of course sitting on Monday in the House proved too much and I think in life, whatever profession you’re in you have to put into the equation your family and also if you are an MP the people you represent and if you can’t represent people to the best of your ability and the family is actually losing out in some way then you have to make decisions and unfortunately her decision was to resign.

KB: Are you disappointed that she couldn’t have waited until the next election?

DS: Well I’d like to have seen her go into the next election I really would but the people of Corby I think you’ll find were not getting the best deal in my view and neither was her family. As I said it is a very, very difficult and a very, very time consuming and committed job to being an MP and she couldn’t dedicate the time she really needed for that job and I think it was right in the end that she did resign I suppose, but it is not good, it is not good for anyone it is not good for the people who elected her who supported her who voted for her in the last election but she’s done what she thinks is right for the constituency

Church of England Disinvests from News Corporation

7th August 2012: The Church Commissioners and the Church of England Pensions Board have today announced the sale of their shares in News Corporation on the advice of the Church’s Ethical Investment Advisory Group (EIAG). The total shareholding sold was worth £1.9 million. As a result, none of the three national investing bodies of the Church of England hold shares in the company.

The Church of England first raised concerns with the Board of News Corporation in the aftermath of the phone hacking allegations that surfaced in July 2011. After a year of dialogue between the company and the EIAG, the Church of England was not satisfied that News Corporation had shown, or is likely in the immediate future to show, a commitment to implement necessary corporate governance reform.

Andrew Brown, Secretary of the Church Commissioners, said: “Last year’s phone hacking allegations raised some serious concerns amongst the Church’s investing bodies about our holding in News Corporation. Our decision to disinvest was not one taken lightly and follows a year of continuous dialogue with the company, during which the EIAG put forward a number of recommendations around how corporate governance structures at News Corporation could be improved. However the EIAG does not feel that the company has brought about sufficient change and we have accepted its advice to disinvest.”

In 1994 the Church of England established the EIAG, the independent advisory group which advises the Church of England’s three national investing bodies on its ethical investment policy. The EIAG engages on ethical and corporate governance issues with many of the companies in which the Church of England has its main equity holdings. Between April 2011 and March 2012 the EIAG held meetings with 40 companies prioritised for engagement, one of which was News Corporation.

The Church of England already excludes investment in companies involved in military products and services, pornography, alcoholic drinks, gambling, tobacco, human embryonic cloning and high interest rate lending.

The Church of England has three national investment bodies: the Church Commissioners for England; the Church of England Pensions Board; and the CBF Church of England Funds. Together they hold a broad range of assets worth in excess of £8 billion. The funds are used to sustain the Church’s network of 12,000 parishes, 16,000 churches, 8,500 stipendiary priests – and their pensions – and 10,000 readers and pastoral assistants and to support the daily work they carry out in their local communities.

Further information:

Communications Office: +44 (0)20 7898 1326
Louis Henderson

Luther Pendragon: +44 (0)20 7618 9100
John Blewett, Alexis Gore, Ben Frankel

Notes for Editors:

The Church Commissioners for England

The Church Commissioners manage a well-diversified investment portfolio, held mostly in company shares and property, to produce money to support the Church of England’s work across the country. The Commissioners were formed from the union in 1948 of two earlier bodies – Queen Anne’s Bounty and the Ecclesiastical Commissioners – set up to support the work of the Church.

The Church of England Pensions Board

The Church of England Pensions Board provides retirement services set by the Church of England for those who have worked for or served the Church. It was established in 1926 by the Church Assembly as the Church of England’s pensions authority. Subsequently it was given wider powers in respect of discretionary benefits and the provision of retirement accommodation to those retired from the stipendiary ministry and their dependents.

The EIAG

The Church of England Ethical Investment Advisory Group (EIAG) makes recommendations on ethical investment policy to the Church of England’s three national investing bodies. The EIAG includes representation from the Church of England’s General Synod, Archbishops’ Council and Council for Mission and Public Affairs, as well as the investing bodies. The EIAG has no investment powers and acts in a wholly advisory capacity. It is the responsibility of the Trustees of each separately constituted investment body to decide whether to implement the advice given.